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Bally X Seidler


PHOTOGRAPHER – Juli Balla
PUBLICATION – Black Magazine
STORY - Bally X Seidler
HAIR - Kenneth Stoddart Chick
MAKEUP – Wayne Chick
STYLIST – Janai Anselmi

Fashion and art have been bedfellows since way back.

 

So much more than a thriving powerhouse, global fashion institute ‘Bally’ began humbly at the start of the 19th century in a basement in Switzerland. Whilst looking for shoes for his wife, Carl Franz Bally realised he could use the same elastic used in his family’s ribbon manufacturing for shoe production. He saw the potential in doing so, to increase employment in his local town and by 1951 The Bally Company employed five hundred craftspeople, transforming what was his local village into a company town, offering healthcare and social services.

 

This truly altruistic act has formed the backbone of one of the oldest luxury brands and shoe design concepts in the world. Bally continues to collaborate with artists, architects and artisans worldwide, with innovative concepts apparent in every collection, store design and advertising campaign.

 

“Good design doesn’t date”(Seidler)

 

Australia’s king of concrete and curves, Harry Seidler, claims to have learned more about design from abstract painter Josef Albers, than in architecture school. Albers created artworks for many of Seidler’s commercial buildings and influenced his cantilever approach rather than traditional modular design.

 

Austrian born Seidler travelled to Sydney in 1948 at his mother’s request to design her home. He brought with him the principles of Bauhaus, a first for Australia, and the methodology of modernism. These developments allowed for more richness in form.

 

Seidler’s work changed as materials and technology developed, but he continued to be inspired by profoundly humanist ideals. His design aim was to always achieve the most practical aesthetic with the least possible means

 

Over his well-documented career, he designed more than one hundred and eighty buildings and he received much recognition for his contribution to the architecture of Australia.

 

See the films here

 

 
 

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